Reverse Osmosis Membranes

The back bone to any good reverse osmosis water filter system is the filter's membrane, and to keep your water tasting and smelling fresh it should be replaced frequently. The majority of contaminants and dissolved solids are removed by the membrane and sent to your sink's drain.

Whether you’re using a reverse osmosis (RO) system for your sinks, a drinking fountain, ice maker, or refrigerators, if you don’t have a working RO filter membrane- or the membrane you’re using is starting to lose its luster- it’s time to replace it. These filters are the last defense against any impurities in your water.

Membranes are what “polish” water right before it exists the tap. After your water passes through the sediment and carbon filters to clean solids, chemicals, and impurities on its first pass, your water then passes through a membrane. The membrane receives all of that pre-treated water and scrubs it one last time before it goes in to a reservoir. In this last push for clean water, the membrane will usually scrub out chlorine, remove bad taste, reduce and eliminate odor, lowers and gets rid of turbidity (that cloudiness you see in an unfiltered glass of water), lower Trihalomethanes (THM’s, which are the result of chlorine used to disinfect tap water and can be carcinogenic at high levels), and remove dirt and sediments not picked up through your other filters.

If you’re using lots of cold water, proper maintenance of your RO water filtration system’s membrane is key. Heat helps kill bacteria and germs,  and helps break down harmful chemicals- that’s why people boil their water to purify it. But not only do harmful elements thrive in cold water, it’s harder to break down solid materials before reaching your tap. With a properly working membrane you won’t have to worry about those elements reaching your drinkable and usable water supply.

Don't wait until the last minute to keep your water safe and tasting great. Membranes are typically recommended to be replaced every 2-3 years but it's best to check with your manufacturers recommended life span.